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August 29, 2019 | 4 Mins Read

Extracting Value from Enterprise Software: How to Pinpoint Software Strengths

August 29, 2019 | 4 Mins Read

Extracting Value from Enterprise Software: How to Pinpoint Software Strengths

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By Greg Lush

The point of value extraction from enterprise software has changed over the years. One of my earliest memories was in the mid-1990s with a fantastic software application that was designed to digitally collaborate across locations, on and offline. For many of you reading this I imagine you are thinking; who cares about the ability to shuffle between on and offline?  During the late 90s in the United States, we all worked with a very slow, and immature internet, just short of having to feed it quarters in order to keep it running (time-based reference to the dimes we carried to feed pay phones). Of course, the ability to seamlessly transition between on and offline was hyper-critical, a process mastered by Lotus Notes (Notes) and their revolutionary "replication" tools. I was working for an Oil and Gas company in Texas and we leveraged Notes like many in the day, everything ran through this platform. Heck, Notes was the only digital tool that we used to communicate with one another, it was a collaborator dream environment. Then, a dark cloud of change rolled in towards the end of the decade, Notes introduced electronic mail to their product, this was the beginning of the end. Email, our first example of a transactional system, and arguably the single most inefficient digital tool ever inflicted upon an organization.

During this time in our computing history it was not uncommon to have only one computer in the office. The accounting person was the first to receive digital technology, often working off a dumb terminal connected to a server located in the broom closet. Time marched on and software manufacturers seized the moment by offering monolithic solutions often referred to as ERP systems. At the core was accounting, manufacturing, supply chain, payroll, etc. Also included, most of the time as third-class citizens, would be some elementary form of file management and email. Notes was well positioned in many organizations and at the time showed no interest in traditional ERP, so everyone seemed to get along, working side by side. However, the water began to get a bit murky as the ERP software manufacturers attempted to capture all of the organization’s licenses. A strong push for several years saw organizations attempt to deploy ERP-based collaboration tools, often these attempts producing lackluster results. Organizations were beginning to accept defeat and become satisfied with an accounting system, email, and some form of file storage (typically handled on local or networked servers). Our first decade of the new millennium had nearly destroyed the collaborative movement, so brilliantly executed by Ray Ozzie and the team at Lotus Notes. The second example of a transactional system, with the monolithic ERP system, had unfortunately set the stage for stunted digital growth. Service oriented architectures (SOA) helped lead the way to integrating products to one another. Although the ERP software manufacturers were holding on tight to their exclusive systems, we were starting to see our first move towards the possibility of leveraging best in class solutions. At the same time, the internet and SaaS providers were busting onto the digital landscape, challenging the enterprise to reconsider their approaches and commitments to these monolithic ERP systems. A long overdue movement was on the horizon, but the biggest question remained: Would the enterprise be able to accept these positive changes? Certainly, a level of comfort had been established leading towards the complacency by many to keep things "as-is.”  Unfortunately, for those suspended in yesteryear, the value of their digital investments has peaked, isolated to a small percentage of functionality in transactional systems, including accounting, service management, manufacturing systems, and email. Ironically, the promise of the holistic ERP system is still alive and well; however, it looks totally different, now encapsulated in inclusive cloud platforms. To take advantage of the shifting sands and fully embrace the promise of ERP, you must change your perspective. Start by separating transactional systems from digital collateral systems. The simplest way to achieve the balance between what belongs inside of transactional system versus what should reside outside is to understand the primary purpose of your enterprise applications. This sounds simple enough, however, we often allow non-software variables impact our decision process. For instance, let's say that you are the person responsible for collections. You are comfortable working inside of the accounting system yet understand that to be effective at your job you need to access and reference more than just a plain text field connected to the accounting AP record. Collections is all about understanding all of the related data, access to conversations and journals, even insight from your deal pipeline. Yet, you are left to make the best of it, attempting to flex the accounting system to provide collaborative content required to decrease the current 48-to-54-day average day sales outstanding metrics. The first step is to establish and communicate the primary purpose of your enterprise applications. Be as objective as possible and summarize these objectives in three bullets or less. Next, with your newly found objective assessment of the digital tools at your disposal, start to map where information may cross over between these applications. Often, accompanying information is workflow, how will you take advantage of triggers and actions to and from these tools? This is where the effort required will vary significantly between those of you with legacy systems and those fortunate enough to have modern, cloud-based digital tools. Armed with your data relationships and workflow, you are ready to lay out a deliberate plan forward which leverages the power of both the transactional systems and your digital collateral systems. It is only when you see each part as their own unique value that you will be able to put them together and create a symphony for your digital enterprise.

August 28, 2019 | 1 Mins Read

Man Vs. Machine: Will AI Replace Field Technicians?

August 28, 2019 | 1 Mins Read

Man Vs. Machine: Will AI Replace Field Technicians?

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Paul Joesbury, Commercial Operations Director at Homeserve, chats with Sarah about how he sees the technician role evolving as AI use grows and matures.

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August 26, 2019 | 3 Mins Read

The Case for a Chief Service Officer

August 26, 2019 | 3 Mins Read

The Case for a Chief Service Officer

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By Tom Paquin

I know what you’re thinking—The last thing that your business needs is another top-down decision-maker imposing their vision on a staff. But hear me out. I have two questions about service at your business.

Here’s the first: Where does the direction of your service business come from, on the executive level, today? Perhaps, if you’re a pure service business, it comes from product. For others, it may be a function of operations. For others still, it may sit solely with the CEO. Perhaps it comes from nowhere. At Future of Field Service, we’ve seen, interacted with, and learned from service leaders, whose titles included these roles, and countless others. The second question is this: Who makes the go/no-go decision on service technology for your business? Does it come from the same department? When is your CTO, CIO, or VP of BI, brought in to advise? Is there already some degree of incongruence within your business, here? Then a Chief Service Officer may be the bridge that you need to bring everything together. There is, of course, a little more to it than just that. Recent news impacting the service delivery industry is a symptom of a shift impacting businesses globally: Service is becoming the centerpiece of business growth. The 2010’s, for many, was the age of the customer. That mindset evolved over the decade based on several trends, including:

  • A shift away from ownership towards products-as-a-service.
  • An oversaturation of products entering the market from new, global entrants and decreasing barriers to entry.
  • A fundamental shift in the economy away from product-focused businesses towards services-focused businesses.
  • The need to diversify product portfolios with low-overhead add-ons that simultaneously offer value to the customer beyond your competitors.
  • Best-in-class manufacturers, retailers, and suppliers creating pathways towards completely upending business practices with service.

There are dozens of other considerations to go along with these. All of these elements come together to make service an urgent consideration, if not for all businesses, then certainly for most. If you’re servitizing a legacy business, or just looking to enhance the service offerings that you have today, a Chief Service Officer is an ideal steward to help navigate your business through difficult waters. Service is a natural outgrowth of operations, but operations, as a function, is generally oriented towards minimizing overhead. This, traditionally, is a key function of service, but in the new service economy, becomes secondary to making service a growth agent for a business. In that way, service decisions may seem to fit more comfortably on the product side of a business, and for many, that might be enough. For businesses where their products aren’t exclusively service, though, the operational elements needed to make service run properly could weigh down the role. Enter the Chief Service Officer. The position that straddles the operations and product world, interfacing with both sides of the business, making service a continued discussion, and helping bridge the gap between the technical elements of successful Service Management adoption and the actual work of field and back-office employees. So what does the Chief Service Officer do? This will obviously differ from company to company, but on a high-level, here are some general ideas:

  • Own the technology rollout for all of service.
  • Work with product to set rigid parameters for service execution.
  • Develop benchmarks, roadmaps, and dashboard to measure service’s impact on the whole company.
  • Set up and execute on service business development efforts within sales.
  • Own the service management platform, tie it to all areas of enterprise resource planning, asset management, and customer experience management.
  • Make the push that your company provides service because it wants to faster a stronger relationship with its customers.

This is by no means a silver bullet for businesses looking to redefine service, but with the right person, and the right organizational outlook, it could be what sets your business on the track towards end-to-end service transformation.

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August 22, 2019 | 4 Mins Read

Are the Results of Cloud-based Outsourcing Projects Perceived Differently by Men and Women?

August 22, 2019 | 4 Mins Read

Are the Results of Cloud-based Outsourcing Projects Perceived Differently by Men and Women?

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By Dr. Marlene R. Kolodziej

In the May, 2014 issue of The Atlantic, Katty Kay and Claire Shipman wrote an article “The Confidence Gap”, and how evidence shows women are less self-assured than men, and in order for women to succeed, confidence matters as much as competence. My doctoral research explored the decision-making process, and particularly the criteria used by executive decision-makers, for identifying and selecting organizational competencies when engaging in Information Technology Outsourcing (ITO) using cloud-based services. As part of that study, participants had the opportunity to describe the effects and actual outcome of their outsourcing decisions on organizational processes, capabilities, skills, and performance; and to note how the results of the outsourcing decision differ or are the same from the expected outcome of the ITO engagement for cloud-based services. One of the findings from that study was an apparent difference in the perception of the success or failure of the outcome for ITO for cloud-based services based on participants’ gender.

But what if the outcome of the cloud-based outsourcing didn’t matter, but the perception of success or failure was real? And what if that perception differed between men and women, regardless of the actual results?

Expectation versus reality. Known as the Dunning-Kruger effect, it is the tendency for some people to substantially overestimate their abilities. The less competent people are, the more they overestimate their abilities. In 2003, David Dunning and Joyce Ehrlinger furthered this research and focused on women, delving into the connection between confidence and competence. Their findings indicated that the women did not pursue opportunities when they were less confident in their abilities, even when performance was equal to men. According to Forbes (2018), a Hewlett Packard internal report found that men apply for a job or promotion when they met 60% of the qualifications, whereas women applied only when they met 100% of those same qualifications. There were 15 participants interviewed individually for the published research, Exploring the Role of Organizational Competencies in Information Technology Outsourcing: A Holistic Case Study on Decision-Making for Outsourcing of Cloud-Based Services, and of those fifteen participants, two identified as female. Only those two females expressed they experienced a negative outcome from their ITO engagements for cloud-based services.  In contrast, while still citing challenges faced by their organizations, male participants in individual in-depth interviews appeared to be more positive when evaluating the outcomes of their ITO engagements for cloud-based services. Male participants in this same study categorized their outcomes as successful, whereas female participants expressed a negative outcome. So with similar outcomes for both male and female executive decision-makers for their ITO engagements for cloud-based services, why such a difference in reported outcomes?  

The Confidence Gap. Stephanie Thomson (2018) discussed a theory known as the “confidence gap”, where women are assumed to feel less confident than men, and are encouraged to be more like men by promoting their accomplishments. While women do self-promote less than men in the corporate world, a wide body of research shows that women have as much confidence in their abilities to lead and perform as men do. Recent research suggests that for a woman, confidence and assertiveness without classic feminine traits such as empathy and altruism will not result in professional success. Research has also shown self-confidence is not awarded equally between men and women, and that men simply could simply increase their organizational influence based on their self-confidence, women could only do the same if they could display their motivation was to the benefit of others, appearing both confident and modest simultaneously. According to Dina Gerdeman (2019), women are more likely to dismiss praise and discount their abilities. One of the biggest problems with closing the confidence gap is the expectation that women are the issue, and the fix is to be is to be more like men, when in reality, normalizing self-promotion, reducing instances of well-documented backlash for women who do self-promote, could bring awareness to implicit gender biases. Early in my career, there was an issue with how my interactions with others were perceived. With representation from both Human Resources and from Leadership, along with my direct Manager, a meeting took place to discuss the issue and come to resolution. My Manager was able to analyze the situation and see through to the core of the problem, and asked those in attendance a simple question: “If Marlene was a man, would her actions be an issue?”. Suddenly it was if a light switch had gone on and each one of the attendees realized that their perception of how I should act was based solely on gender, and not on the actions themselves.

Where do we go from here? While more research is needed in gender-based decision-making and perceptions of outcomes, particularly when outsourcing to the cloud, recognition of these differences and the impact to corporations and their employees is significant. Confidence, self-promotion and extra encouragement are all areas where corporations and managers can focus to close the gender gap. Business leaders need to consider how confidence levels, especially for women, impact organizations, and recognize, reward, and encourage engagement and self-promotion equally.

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August 21, 2019 | 1 Mins Read

Women in Field Service LIVE From Amelia Island

August 21, 2019 | 1 Mins Read

Women in Field Service LIVE From Amelia Island

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Live from Field Service Amelia Island 2019, Sarah talks with Sarah Wright of ResMed, Maria Pallotta of Canopy Lawn Care, and Dr. Marlene Kolodziej of Northwell Health about creating intentional diversity and what the future of field service holds for women.

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August 19, 2019 | 3 Mins Read

Need, Skill, Will: The Path to Successful Technology Adoption

August 19, 2019 | 3 Mins Read

Need, Skill, Will: The Path to Successful Technology Adoption

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By Sarah Nicastro, Creator, Future of Field Service

I had the good fortune last week of interviewing Paul Joesbury, Commercial Operations Director at HomeServe, for an upcoming episode of the Future of Field Service podcast (his episode will air August 28th, and it’s a must listen!). The conversation produced a wealth of valuable points, and as we prepare the episode for your listening pleasure, I thought I’d start by sharing Paul’s thoughts on what it takes to get employees to adopt new technology.

Paul and I discussed the evolution that’s taking place with field technicians – the younger technicians joining the workforce are not only comfortable with technology but lost without it. “The new technicians coming on are digital native – they were born with a phone in hand,” says Paul. “For those technicians, if a process is outlined cleanly on their devices, it is second nature to them to follow along and use it correctly.” The older generations of technicians struggle, however. “Some of the challenges companies like ours face with technology adoption among older workers would surprise many. You may not think you need to teach someone how to swipe on a device, but in many cases, you do – that’s just the reality of it,” says Paul. In these cases, it is imperative to put a change management strategy in place in an effort to get these workers to truly embrace the tools you’re introducing. “You can’t just impose new technology onto your workforce – it doesn’t work. Imposition causes resistance, and that resistance will inhibit any of the progress or forward motion you’re looking to make by introducing that technology,” says Paul.

3 Keys to Change Management

In Paul’s experience, successful change management and fostering adoption of technology comes down to three factors: need, skill, and will. “By focusing on the need, skill, and will, you can create the buy-in you need among employees to achieve successful technology adoption,” says Paul. Start with the need. Is the new tool necessary? Does it provide value? If this sounds ridiculously obvious to you, that’s great – but the reality is that many organizations make investments and force new tools for reasons besides the fact that the workforce and the business actually needs them. Your strategy must be centered around the needs of your workforce in meeting the goals you’ve set forth for the business. Deploying tools that will provide real value and make their jobs easier gets you on the path to success. You also need to focus on communicating with your workforce on the “why” for the changes you’re making and the technologies you’re introducing. If they understand the root cause for change and have an opportunity to weigh in and feel heard, they will have an easier time stepping outside their comfort zones. Next comes skill. To Paul’s point earlier, you may need to start with training more basic than you’d assume. Pay attention to what employees’ concerns or questions are around and address them quickly and extensively. Think about the full extent of education and training you will need to provide to ensure that your employees will feel comfortable using the new tools you’re introducing. If you encounter hesitation or resistance, take this as your cue to begin again. I know it can be frustrating to spend time, money, and energy on training that seems basic, but making this investment up front will ultimately pay off. If you take the time to focus on conveying the need and developing the skill, you should be able to create the will among your employees to embrace the change. “Your goal is to create the desire within your workers to use the tools you’re introducing, to embrace the changes you’re making within the business,” says Paul. “You can’t be successful without their buy-in, so following these steps and working diligently to create it is really the key to any successful transformation.”

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August 15, 2019 | 4 Mins Read

Scroll Vs. Search: Investing in Efficiency

August 15, 2019 | 4 Mins Read

Scroll Vs. Search: Investing in Efficiency

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By Greg Lush

My day started in the normal manner — start my computer, go get a cup of coffee, come back to the Windows 3.1 boot screen, enter my credentials and make a lap around the office spreading my morning cheer. The final leg of my journey would be to connect to our local file server and begin my work. However, today was special, I have been asked to explore the Internet. Some of our competitors had been using the Internet for a few years but my organization was, let's say, conservative. Waiting for me was a nice U.S. Robotics modem, a phone line, connected to my computer exclusively. As the modem attempted to connect the Internet to my PC it seemed as if it was teasing me with its odd melody. The suspense was over when I finally connected and greeted with a single rectangle and a "search" button. Now, this was quite an accomplishment. I thought to myself; "can't wait to show everyone else, if I could just locate the file and folder structure, browsing the internet would be a cinch." Yet, the comfortable structure I was accustomed to for so many years was nowhere to be found. Could it be that this new Internet wanted me to just type what I was looking for? What happens if I don't really know what it is that I want? Suddenly my excitement captured earlier turned into anxiety. Is it possible this damn computer and Internet were going to make me feel inferior?

Ridiculous is the thought going through my brain as I typed the first paragraph. Not the story above, as that happened everyday across the world years ago. Instead that organizations still suffer with the challenge employees face between scrolling and searching. Somehow, and I have yet to understand the conditions which cause this phenomenon, when folks walk through their organization’s doors, they seem to mysteriously forget how to search. For me, when helping companies expand their digital enterprises, I will often group users into two buckets, each having their own approach regarding transformation, they are scrollers and searchers.

  • Scrollers: It stands to reason that workers which are accustomed to finding files on a file server or local hard drive are comfortable with scrolling. The company configures a logical folder structure and teaches their employees how to access, upload and lightly search this file management environment. Prior to the cloud, and robust search tools, this made sense; however, this practice today is like a person using an abacus instead of a calculator. Not to mention that the logic of any file structure is only understood 100% by the file/folder creator, everyone else is compromised. We are not suggesting that all folders and cloud libraries be eliminated, and one big-ass file bucket be used instead. However, you should challenge yourself and your organization with one of two quick questions:
    • Five times "why" | popularized by every child between the ages of four and seven. Examine your file structure and ask why five times over. Each time you cannot answer why, trim the structure.
    • Four by four | challenge your team to think about their file structures, for any given discipline, as only four on the initial layer and no more than four deep. This exercise will force you to look at things differently.
  • Searchers: For those comfortable in these modern times, search may already be a subconscious activity: need something, open an internet browser, and enter what you need. However, for many, searching content is an overwhelming ask. Within an enterprise, creating a predictable behavior from search, and getting folks comfortable is key. You may consider a couple activities to help folks get proficient in searching the enterprise:
    • Load it up | get as much information as possible in your cloud platform BEFORE you begin promoting the power of internal search. You will not be given many chances to win over your audience, each time they come up empty handed will be strikes against your efforts.
    • Consistency | although some would argue that modern search engines can search every piece of data, file name, description, and all the file's contents, you should still have a plan. For instance, if you organize your digital collateral starting with the customer and then work into any related information, the searcher will be relieved as in their mind if they find the customer, they may have the chance to scroll through related content.

To succeed in recalling digital collateral in the enterprise you must get your associates comfortable with search. The transformation is a deliberate activity, well-planned and sequenced. In my recent experience, especially with cloud platforms, they can be overwhelming for the user and I like to start with:

  • Comfort before full commitment | let's say that you are moving from a shared file server or local file storage culture to the cloud. Ten days prior to your cutover suggest ten minutes a day for ten days prescription, like someone taking antibiotics. At the conclusion of the ten-day period, set the shared drives to a "read-only" mode, focusing on getting as much of the information as possible into the cloud platform.
  • Immersion training | get your hands on a demo environment loaded with content and teach searching techniques within that test data set. The key is to have folks find what they are looking for immediately, show the search function (predict successful searches PRIOR to attendees arriving) and have the attendees search with success.

Invest the time in search, it may seem unnecessary at first blush seeing as we all search for content, continuously. Yet, each minute spent with internal employees raising their comfort levels will pay off exponentially in adoption and efficiency.

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August 14, 2019 | 1 Mins Read

Survive or Thrive: Charting Your Path to Field Service Success

August 14, 2019 | 1 Mins Read

Survive or Thrive: Charting Your Path to Field Service Success

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Alastair Clifford-Jones, CEO of Leadent Solutions, joins Sarah to talk through his company’s Service Maturity Model and to give tips on how to get your organization where it needs to be to thrive.

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August 12, 2019 | 3 Mins Read

Field Service Getting the Attention It Deserves

August 12, 2019 | 3 Mins Read

Field Service Getting the Attention It Deserves

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By Sarah Nicastro, Creator, Future of Field Service

I was on vacation last week sipping a Pina Colada by the pool (OK, wrangling toddlers is a more accurate description) when I read the news that Salesforce had acquired ClickSoftware. To me, this signals exciting times for any of us involved in the world that encompasses field service. A function that was once viewed as a cost-center, and often an afterthought, is getting its turn to be recognized as the wealth of opportunity it really is for any company.

I’m coming up on twelve years covering field service, and the evolution I’ve witnessed is something that I’ve personally found exciting for quite a long time (if you’d asked me if I’d find “field service” exciting before I happened into it, I’d have looked at you with a blank stare for sure – but I’ve grown to love it). I’ve witnessed a shift – slow at first and gaining speed – in how companies view and utilize field service. Last week’s acquisition, in my opinion, illustrates the fact that field service has arrived. No longer is it an afterthought or a necessary evil, but rather it has become a strategic arm of the business. A path to differentiation, a valuable way to delight and endear customers, an opportunity to grow revenue. Salesforce’s interest in ClickSoftware is validation of just how much potential exists in field service – not just for field service management providers, but for companies ready to embrace what field service can do for their businesses.

This excitement has been building for some time. At this year’s Field Service Palm Springs event, the buzz was different than ever before. Attendees were no longer skeptical of the need to invest to advance their service efforts, but ready to learn how to do just that. They were more excitedly sharing their strategies for becoming more strategic with field service and listening closely to hear what their peers are doing. The companies I’ve interviewed for the Future of Field Service podcast since we began in April are more passionate than ever before about where the industry is headed, the journey their organizations are on, and their personal roles in it all. I’m thrilled to be covering this space and to uncover along with you all the potential that unfolds in the next couple of years.

In light of last week’s news, and news yet to come, I’d urge you to work diligently to educate yourselves on the potential for your organization around field service as well as your various paths for reaching that potential. I’ve always been a staunch proponent of learning from your peers – I think hearing what people in similar positions in other service-based businesses are doing can provide greater value than any other form of content, which is why I’ve worked hard in my career to focus on providing exactly that. There are companies leading the charge in achieving the full potential that is field service – you can find a few examples here and here. Consuming content like this, attending events like Field Service and The Service Council Symposium, and looking for other ways to network one-on-one with your peers are some of the best ways to collect objective insights. As the hype around field service continues to build, which it will, the onus is on you to do your due diligence on the strategy, technology, and change management that will allow you to embrace the potential that exists.

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August 8, 2019 | 4 Mins Read

Ten Quick Tips for Customer Journey Mapping Success

August 8, 2019 | 4 Mins Read

Ten Quick Tips for Customer Journey Mapping Success

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By Laurence Cramp

A customer journey map is a visual or graphical interpretation of the overall story from an individual's perspective of their relationship with an organisation, service, product or brand, over time and across the channels they utilise. The story is told from the customer's perspective, but also emphasises important intersections between user expectations and business requirements.

No two journey maps are alike, and regardless of format they will allow you to consider interactions from your customers'points of view, instead of taking a business outwards focus. They can be used in both current state review and future state visioning to examine the present, highlight pain points and uncover the most significant opportunities for building a better experience for customers. The process of customer experience mapping is a joint activity - the process itself being just as important as the actual artefact. The discussions that experience mapping fosters and the consensus it builds are important building blocks to any future customer experience transformation action. There is no single way to map customer journeys nor is there any one right answer. In this blog we give you ten quick tips to improve your journey mapping sessions.

Tip One - Set clear objectives for the workshop

You need to make these clear for your customer journey mapping workshop (just like for any well run workshop!) Be sure to communicate (perhaps in advance) the focus for the session; your intended timings; the planned attendees and any success criteria for the workshop including the outputs intended. Make sure you have set clear expectations to manage any resistance that may occur in advance.

Tip Two - Set the context

Typically this will be some form of group orientation to the problem space, customer personas and to brief the group on prior discovery and customer research activity. This will help to get workshop attendees aligned to any prior work and ensure they are thinking in the right way for the workshop session.

Tip Three - Form the teams

Dividing participants into teams of four to six and ensure each has a balance of roles, seniority, customer experience and functions. Get the team working together as this will be crucial to your success.

Tip Four - Persona orientation

Focus attendees on exploring the dimensions of the persona (s) to be used as the lens for the customer journey, including any verbatims from real feedback. They need to be aware that this will be lens through which they will conduct the journey mapping.

Tip Five - Starting the journey

Encourage each team to go through the research notes and their understanding systematically and pull out the post-it-note points for each of the customer journey map areas following a well structured process.

Tip Six - Assemble the journey map

Use nominated people from each team to move the post-it notes to a large form template of the customer journey outline. Success here is all in the preparation!

Tip Seven - Consolidate

Depending on how you are structuring your outputs, work together as a large group to consolidate, challenge and iterate the emerging journey map, seeking relationships amongst the findings of each group. Keep a spirit of openness and constructive discussion rather than criticism.

Tip Eight - Finalise

By the end of the session, start to draw out insights and opportunities structured around an agreed (or draft) Journey Map for the nominated persona.

Tip Nine - Summarise

Towards the end of the workshop be sure to review achievements and highlight next steps and how the work will be progressed (whether by the same team or not).

Tip Ten - Sketch the map

Building the map itself will take time. Whether in or outside of the workshop be sure to walk it through with others and iterate and edit as you go. For longer sessions (ideally 1.5 days) the second half day can be used to develop and refine the sketched draft of the map itself. Map the experience from beginning to end and be as comprehensive as you can. Ideally one touchline will cover the entire experience but if this is too complex you can map a touchline for each key customer interaction. Try to think beyond the obvious and look before and after the immediate touch points with your organisation.

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We love customer experience and can help you to improve how your organisation delivers more customer-centric products, services, processes and technologies. We can help you run your next customer experience programme or we can help to give you the tools and techniques to do so yourself. Why not get in touch with us to find out more?

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